motivated | WDG
Call us:   +44  (0) 1494  772 436
WDG - Bringing clients closer to their customers

Archive : Tag

Big up your customer contact charm offensive

 

wordcloud (3)Customer Experience is something I expect we all know a fair bit about. We are all customers and at the user end of hundreds of products and services daily, the experience of which is mostly subliminal until something exceptional happens. At this point we are propelled towards delight in one direction (tweet, tweet, fb, fb!) or deep disappointment in the other (tweet, tweet, tweet, fb, fb, fb!!)*.

As a CX researcher I pay close attention to the performance of companies called to deal with complaints, requests for refunds, dispatch of replacement items or booking appointments for repairs. Most of us understand that a company that cares about its customers will employ people who are well trained in dealing with the public empathetically, and who have a good knowledge of the company’s products. Retailers like Waitrose and John Lewis, and online retail like Amazon, First Direct and Office Depot (Viking Direct) have taken creating a positive customer experience to a fine art. They understand the equation:

Happy customers = loyal customers = customer advocates = £££

The many organisations that outsource their customer contact services needn’t lose out on achieving positive CX so long as the appointed agency understands its value to the client, and the need for training consistent with the client’s internal programme.

But just think how many times you have contacted a customer enquiries or credit control line only to be transferred multiple times across some complicated telephony system before speaking to someone who is ill-equipped to deal with your enquiry. Or, you become stuck in a queue with other equally frustrated customers. When the time comes to replace the product or renew the service contract this experience will inevitably be a factor in deciding to stick with the company or go elsewhere.

Yet, the path to CX enlightenment is not overly littered with obstacles if the company’s focus on its customer is in the correct place: at the heart of the business. So here are a few basic steps towards creating satisfied customers:

  • Employ people for front line positions (sales floor, customer services, contact centre, credit control) who stand out in interviews as personable, energetic, eager to learn and empathetic
  • Ongoing product and services training across the business. Of course the level of knowledge required depends on the department, but a customer services agent who can converse with a customer about a product, understand the issues and reach a good and rapid resolution is a powerful advocate for the company.
  • Treat every customer as an individual, their relationship to the product or service bought (or intending to buy) is as important to the company as it is to the customer
  • Improve the telephony process: reduce call answering times, speak to an operator rather than an automated redirection message, good training (as above) will ensure the caller is directed to the correct department.
  • Select outsourced services such as contact centres and logistics on the basis of shared customer focus and empathy, good training and personable call handlers. Outsource agents should share the company’s values
  • Go beyond the CRM in trying to understand the customer
  • Set performance indicators to measure improving customer relationships, and to identify where greater attention and training is needed.

For more details on measuring customer experience levels, or any aspect of CX please contact WDG Research.

 *The reference to social media where more comments are posted when customers have a negative experience than a positive one is borne out by years of CX (customer experience) research carried out by WDG Research.

 

The perfect modern marriage of Marketing and Insight

To drag out an old cliche, everyone’s a critic now. Cliche’d or not it has never been more apt in an era of social media where customers are increasingly airing their opinions and companies are struggling to respond fast enough. Sometimes the opinions are positive, constructive, and affirming, but some are negative and occasionally damaging in their vitriol. The fact that each customer is likely to share their bad experience with, on average, 5.3 social contacts (American Express Global Customer Service barometer) should be sufficient evidence for companies to realise that they need to forge better relationships with their market and pre-empt potential bad experiences. In other Marketing needs to tighten its control over its brands.

If a negative experience can send shockwaves rippling across Facebook, consider the impact of a positive  customer experience. Customers who feel valued and listened to soon become advocates of your brand, and since people are more inclined to take recommendations from friends and peers rather than advertising or marketing, a glowing review is more effective in building brand loyalty and trust.

Engaged customers are invaluable; they understand the brand, have positive associations with it, know what it delivers in the way that they as individuals interface with it i.e. their own personal journey.  This intellectual capital, when tapped into and employed becomes an extension of marketing’s think-tank. The honest opinions and real-time reactions of a social community of brand advocates and influential customers is  invaluable when it comes to creating and progressing concepts and ideas. This engaged community make important contributions to the process and their reward is knowing that they have a say in how their brand is developed and communicated.

In the ‘olden days’ marketers rejected the idea of customers as creatives. Today Co-creation is a valuable insight and development process. It uses the creative energy of engaged consumers, brand experts, designers and stakeholders to significantly reduce the idea generation and gestation stage of a new product or marketing campaign. Physically bringing these groups together in a day of co-creation activity can’t be described as an exact science but is a hugely successful approach to Big Thinking where  disruptive ideas emerge, are refined and developed until desirable concepts emerge. The entire approach is inclusive to all groups and entirely transparent.

Co-creation online is sometimes criticised as unwieldy with no control over intellectual property. However, many companies have achieved success using this approach. Coca Cola most famously used a global online community to co-create ‘Energize Refreshment’ as explained by Leonardo O’Grady ASEAN Director of Integrated Marketing Communications http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyLh9jwVCGs

Insight techniques are developing as fast as consumers are becoming digitally sophisticated. That’s not to say that keeping close to customers and involving them in brand decisions has become less complicated. It hasn’t but the advantage with today’s insight tools is that companies can  engage 24/7 with their customers, identify brand advocates, and tap into their intellectual capital. It’s all about using insight to deliver better understanding of customers, build brand loyalty and respond in real-time to marketing challenges.

 

 

Risks with Research

Talking Marketing Research here. There are plenty of risks taken, shelved and avoided in business; that’s what makes it exciting. In marketing research the plan is to lessen the risk with clever insights using carefully considered research design.

When I was a junior client researcher I attended numerous training courses and workshops aimed at increasing my understanding of research techniques and analyses. Without fail, someone would mention ‘risk limitation‘; that by using market research to test theories or products or customer opinions it limits the company’s risk of making a costly mistake. Some went as far as to say that risk limitation is the definition of marketing research.

In my last blog I referred to an article questioning if companies are becoming more risk averse. Certainly, the article mooted, UK companies were more risk averse than their US and European counterparts. This has been reflected in the shallower depth of pockets of most marketing departments, although more recently budgets have improved since the economy has shown ‘shoots of recovery’.

Risk aversion in a competitive market is a foolish strategy. By definition it limits investment where there is no tangible proof of return. Many large companies have already invested in software to keep a keen eye on their customers and suppliers: in-house CRM and Salesforce systems serve as eyes and ears among a definitive audience; digital marketing activity, channel marketing and social media monitoring effectively keep the audience busy. But how do metrics, likes and click thru’s convert to sales in a dynamic market? And what of stagnated product development and the open invitation to competitor’s to enter, or the impact of competitors’ activity on customer loyalty? What effect does risk aversion have on employees?

In a non risk averse environment marketing research limits the risk by identifying pinch points in any development plan. These glitches can be ironed out by further research so that at each stage the level of risk diminishes.  A program of research drawn up at the same time as the marketing plan/strategy keeps a hold on the budget and prevents it from spiraling off the chart. It is not a case of the more you spend on research the less the risk, but the greater the risk is when you fail to acknowledge the value of marketing research.

Risk management is a much healthier strategy for uncertain economic times. Knowing which activity to progress relies on more than in house metrics.  Ad hoc marketing research is needed from concept development to launch and beyond. A multi media campaign, brand launch, or promotions campaign, for example will require measures to test their effectiveness, that the message is understood and engaged with.

Marketing research does not sit aloof from CRM and Salesforce systems. Rather, it works alongside the data, fleshing it out and making sense of what is happening. As marketing spend recovers from the austere years UK companies will be more challenging in their campaigns I have no doubt. Where there is great (marketing) success, there will be a fine researcher.

 

 

 

 

A random thought to boost business in the community

POSTED ON September 24th  - POSTED IN Business Leadership, General Stuff, Networking, SME Marketing, Social Media

Do you ever ask yourself whose responsibility this is? Aren’t Central and local government and the Bank of England tasked with this?

If your business is doing well and has been one of the success stories to rise out of the recession then hearty congratulations. Your success is no doubt offering a boost in employment and supplier contracts to your local economy and there are additional and obvious benefits to this.

For some localised businesses however, a return to growth seems a long way off. Securing the right amount of funds to invest in business continues to be difficult as banks are still refusing to take the risk and are sometimes downright myopic.

The good news we hear is that the economy is showing signs of growth as reported by Bank of England Interest Setting Committee who have revised this year’s final quarter estimates from 0.5% to 0.7%. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has also revised its prediction to a 1.5% growth in the UK economy compared with 0.8% set in May 2013. The Metro reported in 3 Sept that retail spending (excl fuel) was expected to increase year on year to August by 2.3%, this in spite of inflation continuing to outstrip wage growth.

So, with all these signs pointing to a brighter future it is madness that there are good businesses, which are often at the tail end of the supply chain, still caught up in the recession’s grip. Firefighting to keep a business viable, lack of investment, and strident cutbacks in all but the essentials does not give these companies sufficient leverage to bounce back.

It has occurred to me that successful businesses could offer assistance to struggling businesses with a view to passing on knowledge, motivation, physical help, and hard cash. Help could take many forms: mentoring where support and advice is needed, financial investment to enable the business to ‘gear-up for growth’, manpower investment (i.e. sharing skills by deploying employees of the successful business to work in the struggling business for a stated period), the list could go on.

The benefits to the successful business are the positive message it sends to employees and future employees, owning a share of a growing business, developing new skills acquired via supported business, positive PR, developing good community relations.

The community benefits as more successful businesses create employment, demand for accommodation (and schools, health centres etc), increase spending in the community occurs….the positive knock-on effect is fairly tangible.

The downside is if the supported company fails. It is a risk and an important consideration – how likely is it to fail? So this is my random thought, but I would appreciate your view.

Lets Focus on Leadership!

POSTED ON October 4th  - POSTED IN Business Leadership, General Stuff, Personal Branding

Shakespeare’s Malvolio in Twelfth Night was a gullible fool of a man, not a leader by any stretch of the imagination, but he was motivated to believe he could achieve greater things by the words of another. Though in this case the words were contained in a letter that was intended as a prank, but he believed it was a message from his employer: “some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them”.
Clever old Shakespeare showed how easy it is to inspire another by being positive. And these words, though originally intended merely to inflate an ego, resound in today’s desire for strong leadership in guiding the country through the recession.
I suspect few leaders are born with a complete skillset, but have innate abilities that help them along the way, such as good communication skills. A good leader is not just someone who can explain their ideas clearly, but who knows how to talk to different groups of people and gain their trust and co-operation. Ascension to the level of trust is also based on placing trust in others and being dedicated to the people around them and with whom they work.
Strong leadership is important across all areas of society not just in government, business and religion, and it needs to be accessible, if only to demonstrate that everyone has the opportunity to become a good leader in their chosen field. And a good leader is a non-egoist, leading by example and building confidence amongst her team through reward, praise and recognition.
My hope is that leadership skills become a subject of value in our primary and secondary education system. The media would have us believe that leadership is not a positive thing but is for an elite set of people who are out of touch with everyday lives, that it can be easily corruptible or vacuous. We are being sent a dangerous message that I feel can only be changed by positive example and education. Britain has an extensive catalogue of strong leaders from which to draw examples.
Arguably the greatest British leader in the last 100 years was Winston Churchill. He became Prime Minister in 1941 when the country was demoralized by a succession of setbacks in the second World War. He realised that he needed to raise morale and re-motivate the population, the military and his war cabinet. He delivered the first of his now famous inspirational speeches to his cabinet and to the people reminding them how great and long a history our island has and that we would not surrender. Churchill knew that to motivate the nation he had to focus on our positive qualities, he had the communication acumen to achieve just that – a lesson in how great leaders inspire greatness. His speeches revived Britain’s sagging spirits and the rest is history…

 
Website designed and developed by BeSeen Marketing